Time Line Over 2 Years IB Computer Science HL ( Weekly Hours 3.5)

Total Weeks Year 1   Term 1 19     Term  2 (11) +  7  + :   Approx  37 Weeks

Total Weeks Year 2    Term 19  Term  2  (11) + ? ( 0 )  Approx   30 Weeks

Total Weeks Over 2 Years  67 Weeks

 Recommended in Hours (125 Hours  + Case Study 20 hours +  Web Science 45 hours  IA )  =  240 Hours =  68 Weeks @3.5 Hours Per Week

Quick Navigation

Topic 2 Computer Organization 2.1-2.13 inclusive ( 6 Hours ) Wk (1 & 2)

Computer Architecture 

Topic 2 

Computer organization (6 hours)

Objective

Teacher Notes  -  (6 hours)

Computer Architecture

2.1.1

Outline the architecture of the central processing unit (CPU) and the functions of the arithmetic logic unit (ALU) and the control unit (CU) and the registers within the CPU.

2

Students should be able to reproduce a block diagram showing the relationship between the elements of the CPU, input and output and storage. The memory address register (MAR) and memory data register (MDR) are the only ones that need to be included.

2.1.2

Describe primary memory.

2

Distinguish between random access memory (RAM) and read-only memory (ROM), and their use in primary memory.

2.1.3

Explain the use of cache memory

3

Students should be able to explain the effect of cache memory in speeding up the system as well as being able to explain how it is used.

2.1.4

Explain the machine instruction cycle.

3

This should include the role of data bus and address bus.

Topic 2 

Computer organization (6 hours)

Objective

Teacher Notes  -  (6 hours)

Secondary memory & Operating Systems

2.1.5

Identify the need for persistent storage.

2

Persistent storage is needed to store data in a non-volatile device during and after the running of a program. LINK Consequences of data loss. TOK If there are no consequences of data loss, why is it stored. TOK There is no such thing as persistent storage. AIM 9 An appreciation of the issues related to both the ever increasing amount of data and a need to retain it.

2.16

Describe the main functions of an operating system.

2

This is confined to a single-user operating system. Technical details are not needed. For example, memory management should be described but how this is handled in a multitasking environment is not expected.

2.1.7

Outline the use of a range of application software.

3

Application software should include word processors, spreadsheets, database management systems, email, web browsers, computeraided design (CAD) and graphic processing software.

2.1.8

Identify common features of applications.

3

Including toolbars, menus, dialogue boxes, graphical user interface (GUI) components. Students should understand that some features are provided by the application software and some by the operating system. S/E This improves usability for a wide range of users. AIM 9 An appreciation of the improvements associated with developments in application software.

Topic 2 

Computer organization (6 hours)

Objective

Teacher Notes  -  (6 hours)

Binary Representatin & Simple Logic Gates

2.1.9

Define the terms: bit, byte, binary, denary/decimal, hexadecimal.

2

2.1.10

Outline the way in which data is represented in the computer.

2

To include strings, integers, characters and colours. This should include considering the space taken by data, for instance the relation between the hexadecimal representation of colours and the number of colours available.

 TOK, INT Does binary represent an example of a lingua franca?

 S/E, INT Comparing the number of characters needed in the Latin alphabet with those in Arabic and Asian languages to understand the need for Unicode.

2.1.11

Define the Boolean operators: AND, OR, NOT, NAND, NOR and XOR.

3

2.1.12

Identify common features of applications.

3

2.1.13

Construct a logic diagram using AND, OR, NOT, NAND, NOR and XOR gates.

Problems will be limited to an output dependent on no more than three inputs. The gate should be written as a circle with the name of the gate inside it.

LINK Thinking logically, connecting computational thinking and program design, introduction to programming.

Lesson Plan & Content 

Wk 1  06 Aug 3.5 Hours

2.1 Inclusive ( 2.1.1 - 2.1.13 )

Lesson Links

Resources 

Home Work / Assessment

Day 1 Monday 2.1.11 - 2.1.13

Logic Gates Content Please click Here

Day 2

Compter Architecture Content Please click Here

Day 3 ( 2.1.9 -2.1.13)

Computer Organisation Content Please click Here

Wk 2  13 Aug 3.5 Hours

Lesson Links

Resources 

Home Work / Assessment

Day 1 Monday

Link

Day 2

Link

Day 3

Link


Topic 4—Computational thinking, problem-solving and programming (45 hours) 4.1 - 4.3 inclusive ongoing Term 1 

4.1 Logical Thinking : Students will acquire these skills by completing 4.2 and 4.3 

4.2 introduction to programming  Searching Sorting Psudeo Efficiency (22 hours)  Wk(3 & 4) 

4.3 introduction to programming (13 hours)  

Topic 4.3

Intro to Programming (13 hours)

Objective

Teacher Notes  -  (6 hours)

Nature of programming Languages

4.3.1

State the fundamental operations of a computer.

2

These include: add, compare, retrieve and store data. Complex capabilities are composed of very large numbers of very simple operations.

4.3.2

Distinguish between fundamental and compound operations of a computer.

2

For example, “find the largest” is a compound operation

.

4.3.3

Explain the essential features of a computer language.

3

For example, fixed vocabulary, unambiguous meaning, consistent grammar and syntax. TOK Language and meaning.

4.3.4

Explain the need for higher level languages.

3

For example, as the human needs for computer systems have expanded it is necessary to abstract from the basic operations of the computer. It would take far too long to write the type of systems needed today in machine code

4.3.5

Outline the need for a translation process from a higher level language to machine executable code.

For example, compiler, interpreter, virtual machine.

Topic 4.3

Intro to Programming (13 hours)

Objective

Teacher Notes  -  (6 hours)

Use of programming Languages

4.3.6

Define the terms: variable, constant, operator, object

2

4.3.7

Define the operators =, ≠, <, <=, >, >=, mod, div.

2

.

4.3.8

Analyse the use of variables, constants and operators in algorithms.

3

For example, identify and justify the use of a constant as opposed to a variable in a given situation. MYP Mathematics: forms of numbers, algebra—patterns and sequences, logic, algorithms.

4.3.9

Construct algorithms using loops, branching

3

Teachers must ensure algorithms use the symbols from the approved notation sheet.

LINK Approved notation sheet

 MYP Mathematics: using flow charts to solve problems in real-life contexts, logic, algorithms

 MYP Technology: design cycle (inputs, processes, outputs, feedback, iteration).

LINK Connecting computational thinking and program design.

4.3.10

Describe the characteristics and applications of a collection.

For example, compiler, interpreter, virtual machine.

4.3.11

Construct algorithms using the access methods of a collection.

Characteristics: • Contains similar elements

4.3.12

Discuss the need for sub-programmes and collections within programmed solutions.

Show an understanding of the usefulness of reusable code and program organization for the individual programmer, team members and future maintenance.

4.3.13

Construct algorithms using predefined sub-programmes, one dimensional arrays and/or collections.

Students will only be required to analyse flow charts in the externally assessed components. Students will be expected to write and analyse pseudocode in the externally assessed components.

Wk ?   

Lesson Links

Resources 

Home Work / Assessment

Day 1 Monday

Link

Day 2

Link

Day 3

Link

Wk ?  

Lesson Links

Resources 

Home Work / Assessment

Day 1 Monday

Link

Day 2

Link

Day 3

Link

Web Science

C.2 Searching the web (6 hours) Wk 2-3

C.1 Creating the web (8 hours) Wk 7-9

C.6 The Intelligent Web  (10 hours) Wk 11 & Wk 13-Wk15

Topic 1—System fundamentals (20 hours)

1.1 Systems in organizations (10 hours)

Topic 1 

Planning and System Installation

Objective

Teacher Notes  -  (6 hours)

1.1.1

Identify the context for which a new system is planned.

2

The extent and limitations of a new system should be appreciated. Organizational issues related to the installation of new systems such as user roles, underlying technologies.

1.1.2

Describe the need for change management.

2

Students should understand there are a number of factors that need to be managed to ensure change is successful. S/E The way that change is managed can have significant effects on employers and employees

1.1.3

Outline compatibility issues resulting from situations including legacy systems or business mergers.

3

INT, S/E When organizations interact, particularly on an international basis, there may be issues of software compatibility and language differences.

1.1.4

Compare the implementation of systems using a client’s hardware with hosting systems remotely.

The benefits and drawbacks of SaaS (Software-as-a-Service) should be considered. S/E, INT, AIM 8 The remote host may be in a different time zone and this can have significant effects on end-users

1.1.5

Evaluate alternative installation processes.

3

Students should be aware of the methods of implementation/ conversion. Parallel running, pilot running, direct changeover and phased conversion. S/E Training issues may require organizations to restructure their workforce.

1.1.6

Discuss problems that may arise as a part of data migration.

INT These include incompatible file formats, data structures, validation rules, incomplete data transfer and international conventions on dates, currencies and character sets.

1.1.7

Suggest various types of testing. 3 The crucial importance of testing at

The crucial importance of testing at all stages of implementation should be emphasized, with the stages clearly defined. Types of testing can include: user acceptance testing, debugging, beta testing. Students should be aware that there are programs that can test other programs, thereby automating parts of the testing process and reducing costs

Topic 1  

User Focus

Objective

Teacher Notes  -  (6 hours)

1.1.8

Describe the importance of user documentation.

2

S/E The quality of user documentation can affect the rate of implementation of the new system.

1.1.9

Evaluate different methods of providing user documentation.

2

Examples should include methods such as: help files, online support and printed manuals. S/E The quality of user documentation can affect the rate of implementation of the new system.

1.1.10

Evaluate different methods of delivering user training.

3

Examples should include selfinstruction, formal classes, remote/ online training. S/E The quality of the delivery of user training can affect the rate of implementation of the new system.

Topic 1.1  

System Backup & S/W Development

Objective

Teacher Notes  -  (6 hours)

1.1.11

Identify a range of causes of data loss.

2

Causes include malicious activities and natural disasters. S/E Malicious activity may be a result of activities by employees within the organization or intruders.

1.1.12

Outline the consequences of data loss in a specified situation.

2

S/E Loss of medical records, cancellation of a hotel reservation without the knowledge of the traveller.

1.1.13

Describe a range of methods that can be used to prevent data loss.

3

These should include failover systems, redundancy, removable media, offsite/online storage.

1.1.14

Describe strategies for managing releases and updates.

Students should be aware of a variety of ways in which updates and patches are made available and deployed. This includes automatic updates received on a regular basis online. S/E, INT Performance issues related to the inability to install updates may hinder end-users and reduce compatibility between systems in

1.2 System Design Basics(10 hours)

Wk Aug 3.5 Hours

Lesson Links

Resources 

Home Work / Assessment

Day 1 Monday

Link

Day 2

Link

Day 3

Link

Wk  Aug 

Lesson Links

Resources 

Home Work / Assessment

Day 1 Monday

Link

Day 2

Link

Day 3

Link


Topic 3—Networks (9 hours)

Wk 3  20 Aug 3.5 Hours

Lesson Links

Resources 

Home Work / Assessment

Day 1 Monday

Link

Day 2

Link

Day 3

Link

Wk 4 27 Aug 3.5 Hours

Lesson Links

Resources 

Home Work / Assessment

Day 1 Monday

Link

Day 2

Link

Day 3

Link

Topic 5—Abstract data structures (23 hours)

Wk 3  20 Aug 3.5 Hours

Lesson Links

Resources 

Home Work / Assessment

Day 1 Monday

Link

Day 2

Link

Day 3

Link

Wk 4 27 Aug 3.5 Hours

Lesson Links

Resources 

Home Work / Assessment

Day 1 Monday

Link

Day 2

Link

Day 3

Link

Topic 6—Resource management (8 hours)

Wk 3  20 Aug 3.5 Hours

Lesson Links

Resources 

Home Work / Assessment

Day 1 Monday

Link

Day 2

Link

Day 3

Link

Wk 4 27 Aug 3.5 Hours

Lesson Links

Resources 

Home Work / Assessment

Day 1 Monday

Link

Day 2

Link

Day 3

Link

Topic 7—Control (14 hours)

Wk 3  20 Aug 3.5 Hours

Lesson Links

Resources 

Home Work / Assessment

Day 1 Monday

Link

Day 2

Link

Day 3

Link

Wk 4 27 Aug 3.5 Hours

Lesson Links

Resources 

Home Work / Assessment

Day 1 Monday

Link

Day 2

Link

Day 3

Link

Year 2

IA Milestones Year 1  and Year 2

March 16 Year 1 -  Deliverable 1: Documents-Client, Client Interviews/Contact, Journal

May  7 Year 1- Deliverable 2: Documents-Journal, Scenario, Proposed Solution (half part of Criterion A)

May 27 Year 1 Deliverable 3: Document-Journal, Scenario, Proposed Solution, Success Criteria (all Criterion A)

Sep 10  Year 2 -  Discuss the I.A. Design Overview with teachers and design it (half part of Criterion B)

Oct 4 year 2  -  Deliverable 4: Document-Solution Overview, Record of Tasks and Design Overview (Criterion B)

Nov 16 year 2  -  Deliverable 5 : IA draft (Criteria A,B and Criterion C Development)

Feb 01 year 2  -  Deliverable 6: Documents-Criteria A, B, C, D, E, Appendices, Video All IA work completed and handled to the teachers

http://ib.compscihub.net/paper3 ( kick off before Summer Break 2019 )

Fundamentals of Algorithms

Big o

bit.ly/bigopy

IB Resources

http://fiscomp.weebly.com/ib-comp-sci-intro.html

http://www.r-5.org/files/books/computers/overviews/software/Glenn_Brookshear-Computer_Science_An_Overview-EN.pdf